⚡Box of 3 @ 999 sale is live. Check out now!⚡

Can Derma Roller Reduce Dark Spots on Face

woman using derma roller on the face

Reduce Dark Spots on the Face with a Derma Roller

Sun exposure, hormone changes, or acne-related inflammation are the most common causes of hyperpigmentation. While there hasn't been much research on utilising a derma roller to treat hyperpigmentation, the procedure has shown promise in terms of skin regeneration and lightening dark patches.

alpha arbutin serum

Dermarolling is a minimally invasive procedure that may help with wrinkles, stretch marks, sun damage, and hyperpigmentation (dark, discoloured regions of skin).

What Is Dermarolling and How Does It Work?

Dermarolling is a therapy that is mainly done at home, although it is also available at certain medical spas. A small portable instrument tipped with hundreds of tiny needles is rolled over the skin. The needles cause small incisions on the skin, prompting the body to produce more collagen and elastin. The skin is smoother and firmer after healing, with fewer symptoms of sun damage. Skin thickness is raised, and stretch marks, fine lines, and wrinkles are decreased. Here are some derma roller uses & benefits:

  • Dermarolling uses small needles to produce minute incisions in the skin to encourage skin cell renewal.
  • By breaking up melanin clumps, it lightens hyperpigmentation.
  • Dermarolling is a minimally invasive procedure that is deemed safe for all skin types and has few adverse effects.
  • Individuals with easily scarring or inflamed skin should avoid this therapy.
  • Sun exposure, hormone changes, or acne-related inflammation are the most common causes of hyperpigmentation. 
  • While there hasn't been much research on utilising a derma roller to treat hyperpigmentation, the procedure has shown promise in terms of skin regeneration and lightening dark patches.
  • Dermarolling is a minimally invasive procedure that may help with wrinkles, stretch marks, sun damage, and hyperpigmentation (dark, discoloured regions of skin).

What Is Dermarolling and how to use a derma roller?

Dermarolling is a therapy that is mainly done at home, although it is also available at certain medical spas. A small portable instrument tipped with hundreds of tiny needles is rolled over the skin. The needles cause small incisions on the skin, prompting the body to produce more collagen and elastin. The skin is smoother and firmer after healing, with fewer symptoms of sun damage. Skin thickness is raised, and stretch marks, fine lines, and wrinkles are decreased.

By breaking up clumps of melanin that appear as dark patches on the skin, this therapy also lightens hyperpigmentation. Derma roller for acne scars is used to treat acne scars, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, melasma, lentigo, or sunspots, among other hyperpigmentation conditions.

Microneedling vs. Dermarolling

Microneedling is a procedure that involves puncturing the skin with small needles to address a variety of skin issues. It's a kind of collagen induction treatment (CIT), which means it encourages the formation of this crucial protein. Microneedling may be done using a derma roller or a derma pen, which is a stamping instrument.

The angle at which the needles penetrate the skin is the fundamental distinction between a derma roller for the face and a derma pen. It's a 90-degree angle on a derma pen and a 45-degree angle on a derma-roller.

Because the angle of needle entrance reduces epidermal injury, derma pen usage results in a faster recovery period and a lower risk of adverse effects than derma rolling. Both devices, however, are essentially equally successful in the treatment of hyperpigmentation.

Is Dermarolling Effective in the Treatment of Hyperpigmentation?

While derma rolling has not been thoroughly researched as a therapy for hyperpigmentation, evidence suggests that it is effective for this purpose. It promotes skin cell renewal, which has been shown to successfully lighten black spots in people of all skin types.

Dark spots of skin will generally need more treatment sessions than milder types of hyperpigmentation, and dermarolling may never completely remove them.

What is the mechanism behind it?

To avoid track marks and uneven penetration, derma rollers must be used in a certain manner. When dermarolling for hyperpigmentation, you may target particular regions of your face for therapy.

Choose a device with a needle size of 0.2 to 1 mm and start with the shortest needle length feasible to cause the least amount of harm to the skin.

The routine is the same regardless of what skin troubles you're treating: roll upward on the skin for 6–8 passes, lifting the device after each pass. Then roll horizontally from left to right for another 6–8 passes. Do not roll diagonally, since this will result in an inconsistent penetration pattern.

Before dermarolling again, wait at least a month for your skin to recover completely. To notice improvements, you'll need many treatment sessions, with more sessions needed to cure darker kinds of hyperpigmentation.

What Kinds of Hyperpigmentation Does It Help With?

The concepts underlying dermarolling imply that it should cure all kinds of hyperpigmentation, even though it has not been extensively investigated as a specialised therapy. These include the following:

  • Scars from acne
  • Hyperpigmentation after an inflammatory reaction
  • Freckles Melasma Lentigo (age spots)
  • Using items containing vitamin C, niacinamide, or hyaluronic acid before and after therapy may improve the effectiveness of this treatment. These anti-ageing compounds promote the development of more collagen, resulting in even better outcomes.

Is it possible for dermarolling to cause hyperpigmentation?

Yes. Dermarolling may exacerbate hyperpigmentation if your skin scars readily. The technique might cause or aggravate dark spots by producing an increase in melanin production in your skin.

To reduce the chances of this happening, patch-test a tiny area of skin to see how your body reacts. If no irritation persists after 48 hours, it's probably safe to treat a bigger region.

Dermarolling should not be used on active acne or pimples since it might spread germs and infect them. Consult a dermatologist if you're unsure if dermarolling is right for your skin.

Other negative consequences

Skin redness, mild swelling, and peeling are common side effects and can remain for several days following treatment.

Sensitive skin may be more irritated after treatment than others, although dermarolling is generally regarded safe for all skin types.

Dermarolling has fewer negative effects than similar procedures like chemical peels, particularly for persons with darker skin tones. This is because of the technique's nonablative nature, which means it doesn't remove any skin. In skin with a lot of melanin, ablative techniques might cause a lot of problems.

Applying topical skin care products to treated areas, such as moisturiser, makeup, or sunscreen, within 24 hours after a treatment session might irritate.

Takeaway

Dermarolling is a device tipped with small needles to generate minute lesions in the skin, stimulating the creation of new, healthier skin in the treated region. Although no studies have demonstrated that dermarolling helps to lessen hyperpigmentation, the concepts underlying the procedure suggest that it should.

To notice effects, this therapy must be repeated numerous times in sessions spaced at least one month apart. Additional treatments are required for more severe cases of hyperpigmentation.

While dermarolling may be used to treat various types of hyperpigmentation, including melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, and age spots, it is not recommended for people whose skin is prone to scarring or inflammation. Dermarolling is a safe and promising therapy for hyperpigmentation with few adverse effects.